Lord Francis Russell

Lord Francis Russell, by George Perfect Harding, after  Unknown artist, 19th century, based on a work of 1573 - NPG 2411 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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Lord Francis Russell

by George Perfect Harding, after Unknown artist
watercolour, 19th century, based on a work of 1573
12 in. x 9 1/4 in. (305 mm x 235 mm)
Purchased, 1929
Primary Collection
NPG 2411

Sitterback to top

  • Lord Francis Russell (circa 1554-1585), Third son of 2nd Earl of Bedford. Sitter associated with 2 portraits.

Artistsback to top

  • George Perfect Harding (1779 or 1780-1853), Portrait painter, copyist and antiquary. Artist associated with 172 portraits, Sitter in 1 portrait.
  • Unknown artist. Artist associated with 6556 portraits.

This portraitback to top

This portrait is after an original in the collection of Woburn Abbey. Francis is shown in similar attire to that of his brother, Edward, in his portrait by the same artist. Behind Francis is a pair of inset scenes depicting a ship on a rough sea and a seated woman in a landscape with snakes and other beasts.

Linked publicationsback to top

Linked displays and exhibitionsback to top

Events of 1573back to top

Current affairs

The radical protestant Sir Francis Walsingham is appointed Principal Secretary . He establishes a large espionage network to protect Queen Elizabeth I.

Art and science

The French Protestant jurist François Hotman writes Franco-Gallia, arguing for representative government and an elective monarchy.
Birth of the architect Inigo Jones.

International

Fernando, Duke of Alva resigns as Spanish Governor-General in the Netherlands after failing to make headway against the Dutch Protestant rebels. He is succeeded by Don Luis de Requesens, who attempts to pursue a more conciliatory policy.
The Treaty of Constantinople ends war between the Ottoman Empire and Venice. Venice cedes Cyprus and increases its annual tribute.
The Duke of Anjou becomes the first elected King of Poland.

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