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Anne of Denmark

1 portrait of Isaac Oliver

Anne of Denmark, by George Vertue, after  Isaac Oliver, circa 1717 (circa 1610) - NPG D21404 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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Anne of Denmark

by George Vertue, after Isaac Oliver
pencil, ink and wash, circa 1717 (circa 1610)
6 3/8 in. x 4 3/8 in. (161 mm x 112 mm) paper size
Given by Frederic Gordon Roe, 1940
Reference Collection
NPG D21404

Sitterback to top

  • Anne of Denmark (1574-1619), Queen of James I. Sitter associated with 49 portraits.

Artistsback to top

  • Isaac Oliver (circa 1565-1617), Miniature painter. Artist associated with 72 portraits, Sitter in 5 portraits.
  • George Vertue (1683-1756), Engraver and antiquary. Artist associated with 864 portraits, Sitter in 7 portraits.

Events of 1717back to top

Current affairs

Count Carl Gyllenborg, the Swedish ambassador, is arrested in London and imprisoned over a plot to assist the Pretender James Stuart.
Bangorian controversy; a theological argument within the Church of England is initiated by the posthumous publication of a treatise written by George Hicks, Bishop of Thetford.
First Freemason's Grand Lodge is founded in London.

Art and science

Actor-manager Colley Cibber stages The Loves of Mars and Venus at the Drury Lane Theatre; the first ballet to be performed in Britain.
Composer George Frideric Handel's Water Music is performed for the first time on a barge on the River Thames for George I.


International

John Law establishes the Mississippi Company to develop trade in Louisiania for France. His scheme results in the 'Mississippi Bubble'.
Triple Alliance formed between England, France and the Dutch Republic to uphold the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht and maintain peace in Europe.
Competition between British and Dutch in factories on the coast of Mauritania results in the first 'gum war' over the lucrative trade in gum arabic.

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