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Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford

11 of 47 portraits by John Dixon

Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford, by John Dixon, sold by  Ryland and Bryer, circa 1767-1772 - NPG D35729 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford

by John Dixon, sold by Ryland and Bryer
mezzotint, circa 1767-1772
15 in. x 11 in. (381 mm x 278 mm) paper size
acquired unknown source, 1952
Reference Collection
NPG D35729

Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • John Dixon (circa 1740-1811), Engraver. Artist associated with 47 portraits.
  • Ryland and Bryer (active 1765-1772), Engravers and printsellers. Artist associated with 30 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D20040: Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford (from same plate)
  • NPG D35728: Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford (from same plate)

Placesback to top

Events of 1767back to top

Current affairs

Birth of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and father of Queen Victoria.
Chancellor, Charles Townshend, passes a series of acts - the 'Townshend Duties' - taxing all glass, lead, paint, paper and tea imported into the American colonies.
Work begins on Edinburgh's New Town, to the design of the 23-year-old architect James Craig.

Art and science

Josiah Spode establishes the Spode pottery manufactory at Stoke-on-Trent.
Philosopher and chemist Joseph Priestley publishes The History and Present State of Electricity.
First annual Nautical Almanac is produced by Astronomer Royal Nevil Maskelyne, allowing mariners to find their longitude while at sea, using tables of lunar distances.

International

'Townshend Duties' cause uproar in America.
First Anglo-Mysore War breaks out between between the Sultanate of Mysore Hyder Ali and the East India Company.
Jesuits are expelled from Spain.
Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon complete a four-year survey to establish the boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland; the Mason-Dixon line.


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