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Derek Jarman; John Maybury

© David Gwinnutt / National Portrait Gallery, London

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Derek Jarman; John Maybury

by David Gwinnutt
modern bromide print from original negative, 1982-1983
14 3/4 in. x 10 1/8 in. (375 mm x 257 mm) image size
Purchased, 2016
Photographs Collection
NPG x199674

Sittersback to top

Artistback to top

  • David Gwinnutt (1961-), Photographer. Artist of 21 portraits, Sitter in 1 portrait.

This portraitback to top

Filmaker Derek Jarman was at the centre of the queer art scene, and the group of young artists and designers who defined it. Jarman and his protégé John Maybury were frequent collaborators. Maybury’s tactile gesture in this portrait speaks to their closeness. Jarman revelled in having his picture taken and liked to stare intensely down the lens. Maybury in contrast tried to avert his gaze from the camera. The graininess of the image lends a sensual and dream-like quality, echoing the visuals in the experimental Super 8 films both men were producing.

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Events of 1982back to top

Current affairs

Unemployment hits 3.6 million in the UK, with one in eight people out of work. The crisis came about as a result of industrial modernisation and restructuring. As a result those out of work were referred to as 'Maggie's millions'.
Charles and Diana have their first child, Prince William, who becomes the second in line for the throne.

Art and science

Richard Attenborough releases his biopic Gandhi, starring Ben Kingsley as the lead. The film was an Anglo-Indian production, featuring a record-breaking 300,000 extras.
The Barbican Arts Centre is opened featuring a concert hall, theatres, cinema screens and an art gallery. In 2003 it was voted London's ugliest building in a BBC poll.
The Thames Barrier opens to protect London from floods due to rising sea levels.

International

Argentina occupies the Falkland Islands beginning the Falklands War. Britain retaliated, and after three months of fighting at sea and on land won back the islands. Following the British victory opposition grew in Argentina towards the military government, while in Britain a wave of patriotism helped Margaret Thatcher to win the general election the following year.

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