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'London Walking & full Dress', October 1805

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'London Walking & full Dress', October 1805

published in The Lady's Magazine
hand-coloured etching and line engraving, published October 1805
7 7/8 in. x 4 1/2 in. (199 mm x 114 mm) paper size
acquired unknown source, 1930
Reference Collection
NPG D47522

Artistback to top

This portraitback to top

Described in the magazine:
1. Cap of worked muslin, with lace border, turned up in front, ornamented with flowers. - Dress of coloured muslin made very long, trimmed down the front and sleeves with velvet: white gloves.
2. Walking-dress of cambric muslin, made high in the neck with a collar, and long sleeves; the waist confined with a band of coloured velvet, and clasps: straw-hat, and yellow gloves.

Events of 1805back to top

Current affairs

Nelson's state funeral is held at St Paul's. An occasion for an outpouring of national grief and patriotism, the grand ceremony built on the cult of Nelson which had emerged in the years before his death.

Art and science

Mary Tighe publishes Pysche or the Legend of Love, a romantic allegory in the fashionable medieval revival style, admired by both Keats and Shelley.
The 'poems of Ossian' are officially declared a fake and a great literary scandal ends as Scottish poet James Macpherson is exposed as the forger of the third century bard's epic works.

International

Battle of Trafalgar. Napoleon's ultimate plan to invade England from Boulogne with 100,000 men is thwarted by superior British naval power. Nelson dies in the closing moments of battle having been wounded by a French sniper, but survives long enough to learn that a decisive victory has been won.

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