John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando')

John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando'), by and published by Robert Dighton, published 22 March 1802 - NPG D1091 - © National Portrait Gallery, London

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando')

by and published by Robert Dighton
hand-coloured etching, published 22 March 1802
10 5/8 in. x 7 3/4 in. (273 mm x 199 mm) paper size
Purchased with help from the Friends of the National Libraries and the Pilgrim Trust, 1966
Reference Collection
NPG D1091

Sitterback to top

  • John Braham (1777-1856), Singer. Sitter associated with 14 portraits.

Artistback to top

  • Robert Dighton (1751-1814), Portrait painter, caricaturist and actor. Artist associated with 318 portraits, Sitter in 4 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D10688: John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando') (from same plate)
  • NPG D1089: John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando') (from same plate)
  • NPG D1090: John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando') (from same plate)
  • NPG D13415: John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando') (from same plate)
  • NPG D13416: John Braham ('Mr Braham in the character of Orlando') (from same plate)

Placesback to top

Subject/Themeback to top

Events of 1802back to top

Current affairs

After returning from Naples, Nelson tours England with the diplomat and antiquarian Sir William Hamilton and his wife Emma, with whom he was having an affair. With Nelson's status confirmed as a national hero, their reception outrivals that of the King.
Extensive strikes in government shipyards led by John Gast.

Art and science

Francis Jeffrey, MP and arbiter of literary taste, co-founds the Edinburgh Review, the influential Whig quarterly which voiced strong criticism of Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey.
The Exchange, where stocks were traded, is rebuilt to cope with an increase in business during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

International

Peace of Amiens; Britain finally agrees to unpopular peace, leaving France the chief power in Europe and returning recent British colonial acquisitions.
Napoleon is declared First Consul of the French Empire for life.
English flock to see the international war plunder now on display at the Louvre in Paris.

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