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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

1 of 6 portraits by Richard Evans

© National Portrait Gallery, London

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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

by Unknown artist, published by Richard Evans
hand coloured etching, published 29 July 1815
9 1/4 in. x 11 1/2 in. (235 mm x 293 mm) paper size
Purchased with help from the Friends of the National Libraries and the Pilgrim Trust, 1966
Reference Collection
NPG D4731

Sitterback to top

Artistsback to top

  • Richard Evans (active 1812-1817), Bookseller. Artist associated with 6 portraits.
  • Unknown artist, Artist. Artist associated with 6557 portraits.

Related worksback to top

  • NPG D4732: Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (from same plate)
  • NPG D4733: Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (from same plate)

Linked publicationsback to top

  • Cox, Paul, Wellington: Triumphs, Politics and Passions, 2015 (accompanying the exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery from 12 March - 7 June 2015), p. 17 Read entry

    The first oil portrait of the future Duke of Wellington was painted by John Hoppner in the mid-1790s, when Arthur Wesley, as he was then known, was around twenty-six years old. Although elegantly posed in the distinctive all-red uniform of the 33rd Regiment, with the loosely styled and powedered hair fashionable in that decade, the fresh-faced complexion, slightly parted lips and the almost quizzical position of the head suggest the hestiancy of a young man about to commit himself to a career. He had recently gained the command of his regiment, and for the near future at least a life in the army was in prospect.

Placesback to top

Events of 1815back to top

Current affairs

John and James Leigh Hunt are released from prison after a two year sentence for slandering the Prince of Wales in their outspoken, radical periodical the Examiner.
Corn Laws are introduced to protect against the collapse in prices which would inevitably follow peace with France, prompting riots in London.

Art and science

Humphry Davy invents the miners' safety lamp though its reception is clouded by William Clanny and George Stephenson who present rival models in the same year.
British Institution arranges first in innovative series of Old Master exhibitions
provoking virulent attack on its patrons for neglecting contemporary art.

International

Napoleon returns to France from exile in Elba and resumes power until his abdication on 22 June; a period known as the 'Hundred Days'.
Battle of Waterloo concludes the Anglo-French struggle that had lasted more than a century. Peace of Vienna establishes Britain's global political, economic and imperial dominance which lasts for the next hundred years.

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