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Lee Miller; Marion Morehouse Cummings

© Condé Nast

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Lee Miller; Marion Morehouse Cummings

by Cecil Beaton
bromide print, circa 1928
9 1/4 in. x 6 1/4 in. (236 mm x 158 mm)
Accepted in lieu of tax by H.M. Government and allocated to the Gallery, 1991
Photographs Collection
NPG x40262

Sittersback to top

  • Lee Miller (1907-1977), Photographer. Sitter in 13 portraits, Artist associated with 17 portraits.
  • Marion Morehouse Cummings (1906-1969), Fashion model; wife of E E Cummings. Sitter in 1 portrait.

Artistback to top

  • Cecil Beaton (1904-1980), Photographer, designer and writer. Artist associated with 1112 portraits, Sitter associated with 361 portraits.

Linked publicationsback to top

  • 100 Fashion Icons, p. 14
  • Pepper, Terence, Beaton Portraits, 2004 (accompanying the exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery from 5 February - 31 May 2004), p. 34 Read entry

    Commissions from Vogue also forced an adaptation, on occasion, to their house style. In the 1920s this meant the elegant control and coolness of Edward Steichen’s work, which was replicated by Beaton in the various editions of the magazine. Similarly styled work was produced by Baron Hoyningen-Huene and his apostle Horst. When Beaton worked in Condé Nast’s exquisitely decorated apartment (the publishing owner of Vogue) on commissioned sittings – such as the fashion study of Marion Morehouse and Lee Miller – it is very much the Steichen ethos that we see emulated.

  • Pepper, Terence, Beaton Portraits, 2004 (accompanying the exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery from 5 February to 31 May 2004), p. 34

Placesback to top

Linked displays and exhibitionsback to top

Events of 1928back to top

Current affairs

The Representation of the People Act 1928 grants women the same rights to vote as men. Building on reform of 1918, this Act lowered the voting age for women from 30 to 21, and removed the ownership of property requirements.

Art and science

Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin. The Scottish scientist's identification of the first antibiotic revolutionised the treatment of infection and is a landmark in medical history. By the Second World War, penicillin was being used to treat wounded soldiers and had a major impact on survival rates of those with infected wounds.

International

Stalin announces the Soviet Union's first Five-Year plan of economic development. Based on Lenin's New Economic Policy, the Five-Year Plans aimed to expand the country's economy through rapid centralised industrialisation.

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